If you keep just one New Year resolution this year, here’s the one to stick to: ‘You will delegate the work you don’t need to do yourself.’

In an earlier post you’ll find ideas to avoid being a ‘busy fool’ – by deciding what to do, what to delegate, and what to dump. But when you’ve made that important decision, the next step is even more important. Because you need to delegate the right work, to the right people, for the right reasons – and get it done in the right way…

The right work

Good – you’re clear about what task you want to delegate. But now you need to take a long, hard look at what, precisely you are doing, and how you are doing it. How would you describe it to someone else? What, exactly, would you ask them to do?

It may sound like a silly question: after all, you probably think that the answer is obvious.

But is it?

If it’s obvious, you should be able to write down what’s needed in a sentence or two. If you can’t, it may not be as obvious as you thought…!

Puzzled? Don’t be. In all likelihood you’ve been doing that job for months or even years. You know precisely what to do and how to do it. But all that information only exists in your head. And until it exists somewhere else, in an accessible form, you can’t really expect anyone else to do it for you.

So – write it down. And, perhaps, discuss it with the person you’d like to do the job. They may well have questions. They may also have suggestions: other ways of doing the work that are simpler, or more cost-effective. That’s the benefit of bringing in someone to help you, after all!

But only, of course, if they’re the right someone.

The right people

If you value your business, you don’t want just anyone to work in it. You’ll want people with genuine, proven ability who can make a real contribution. In fairness, that could include members of your family, but they may well have other things to do which they would regard as more important. (Like doing their own job. Or feeding the cat. After all, they may not want to work for you…)

If they’re an employee, be sure they are a good ‘fit’ for the job you’re asking them to do – and that they feel willing and able to do it. If they’re the right person in principle, but lack the necessary experience, you’ll need to invest in training them. That may well be a good investment, but you need to be confident that it’s worth making.

If you’re looking outside the business, at someone you don’t know well – such as a Virtual Assistant – you’ll need to check out their credentials. (And, ideally, what other clients think of them – perhaps via social media). Anyone can talk the talk, but you need the substance. And you need to get on with them on a personal level, as well – after all, they’re effectively going to be a part of your team.

The right way

Of course, trust is an issue, too. Depending on the nature of your business you may need your outsourcing supplier to sign a confidentiality agreement – especially given the more stringent rules around data protection from May 2018. And consider any terms and conditions you may need to apply – including, for example, permission for them to outsource work which, for any reason, they cannot do themselves.

Think of ‘trust’, and inevitably the next word you are likely to think of is ‘risk’. So what are the risks of outsourcing the work you have in mind? If something went wrong, what effect might that have on your business? Your answer is likely to shape your initial agreement with your new partner.

If the risk is relatively low, the best approach is probably to arrange an agreed trial period so you can see how the arrangement will work. If the risk is greater you will certainly want to set specific terms and conditions around the trial, and arrange for regular performance reviews. You will also want to have a Plan B available in case it doesn’t work out!

Inevitably things you haven’t thought of will come up (they always do) but a good, responsive outsourcing supplier will be aware of that and respond to feedback. If they don’t – or if their response is less than helpful – then it’s time to move on and find someone else! Every good business welcomes feedback. (You do – don’t you?)

Need a little help? Then please get in touch for a free fact-finding consultation.