Delegation: if I’d known you were coming I’d have baked a cake

Delegation: if I’d known you were coming I’d have baked a cake

Picture by kind permission of Jess Fotheringham of Pickacake – Jess makes all her own cakes and decorates them, too! See more at www.pickacake.co.uk and www.facebook.com/jesspickacake/

It’s great talking about delegation in theory, but how does it work in practice? Let’s look at an example…

Say you’re a wedding cake specialist whose business is just taking off. Which means you’re now so busy that you’re working past 11 pm most nights.

So – what could you delegate?

After a little thought, you start making a list, which includes:

  • handling telephone enquiries
  • handling online enquiries (via email, Facebook, your website etc.)
  • taking orders
  • collecting (and chasing) payment
  • posting on social media
  • delivering the finished cake

Those are all fairly obvious. None of this work requires your key skills, and all of it can easily be done by someone else. But you might also consider a more radical solution. Suppose – for example – that you decide your key skill is cake decoration. In that case you might consider outsourcing the actual cake making to someone you can really rely on.

How, exactly, could you go about doing that?

Start with three questions

What are you delegating? Why are you delegating it? And to whom will you delegate?

What you are delegating sounds simple – but is it? Will you delegate just the basic cake making, or the cake making and basic icing?

Why you are delegating also sounds simple – after all, you’re already working too hard. But what is your plan? Do you want to stop work earlier but still produce the same number of cakes? Or do you want to increase productivity – to make more cakes during the time you are working?

And the questions don’t stop there.

You have a good reputation, which you want to keep. So are you going to specify a particular recipe? Will you insist on free range eggs? Will you specify the source for those eggs? What size – or sizes – of cake do you want made? Are you supplying tins, or are they? How will you keep in contact with your supplier? (Phone? Email? SMS? Messenger?) And will you want them to acknowledge all your orders – in detail?

Sounds finicky? Not really. Just consider a realistic example…

You place an order for ‘an 8-inch cake, wanted Monday’. At this point you know exactly what you mean by that – but your supplier doesn’t. For instance, are they delivering the cake, or are you picking it up? Do you need it cooled before collection or delivery, or could it still be warm from the oven? Do you want it in a tin, or wrapped in greaseproof paper? And when, exactly, do you want it? By 10 am on Monday? By close of play on Monday?

There’s a lot to think about – and we haven’t even considered what’s probably the most important question – to whom?

Can you trust your new supplier?

You’re delegating a job that is vital to your business. If your new supplier gets it wrong, you will lose customers – and, more importantly, you could lose a reputation that’s taken a long time to build.

So you’ll want to spend some time checking them out. You might even consider placing a trial order to see how they perform – ordering a cake you don’t intend to sell, just to see for yourself that it’s a good cake. And once you’ve made your choice, you need to listen to your customer feedback, and check that the change works for them, too.

In short, delegation involves a lot of questions – including quite a few you may not have thought of. Because it’s all about process. And that’s my speciality.

So if you’d like a little help, why not book a chat with me today? No pressure, no fee, no obligation.